Search results for "health impact assessment"

Nonprofit management Intern

 

Internship Opportunity-

Nonprofit Management Intern

The Illinois Public Health Institute is seeking a graduate student to provide hands-on support in a variety of domains related to nonprofit management.

1)    Description of Illinois Public Health Institute

The Illinois Public Health Institute (IPHI) is a partnership of public, private and voluntary organizations that seeks to maximize health, wellness and quality of life for the people of Illinois.  IPHI administers a number of partnership-driven projects addressing specific program areas, including the Center for Community Capacity Development (CCCD), the Center for Health and Information Technology (CHIT), and the Center for Policy and Partnership Initiatives (CPPI).

IPHI stands at the nexus of public health planning and policy, with programs, partnerships or projects in Reducing Health Disparities, working on the State Health Improvement Plan, Training and Technical Assistance for local health department (LHD) assessment and certification, a pilot for voluntary LHD Accreditation, Quality improvement and performance management training and technical assistance, the development of a statewide Public Health Web-based Data Query System, coordination of stakeholder engagement for large-scale health information system design initiatives, and leadership and advocacy around preventing obesity in Illinois.

2)    Description of the project/placement/practicum

The exact nature of the Internship tasks will be negotiated between the Intern and the Intern Supervisor, depending on needs, skills and interests.  Possible internship tasks include:

  • Coordinate the work of the organization’s Board of Directors, advisory committees, councils, task forces and teams, including establishment of meeting schedules, recruitment and participant communication, creation of meeting agendas, minutes and materials, and facilitation of meetings to accomplish project goals as necessary.
  • Draft, review, comment and edit organization, department and programmatic goals and objectives.
  • Draft, review, edit, interpret and report on budgets, spending plans and other financial reports.
  • Research, draft, and review human resources policies and procedures.
  • Research and test administrative software packages relating to non-profit operations.
  • Support fundraising and resource development plans in partnership with development consultants and project staff.
  • Research, draft, edit and review organizational policy materials.
  • Participate in local, regional and national gatherings relevant to organizational interests and operations, both with senior staff and as their representative.
  • Draft and review materials for state, federal and foundation reporting requirements.
  • Administrative and clerical support for all of the above tasks.

3)    Skills that would be desirable to accomplish this project

Qualified applicants will possess the following: excellent verbal and written communication skills; strong organizational skills; ability to take initiative on projects; comfortable working independently and in a team; an interest in improving the public health through policy and systems change.

Additional requirements include: interest in the development and management of large-scale systems change, willingness to work on a project where the long-term impact won’t be realized during the internship; writing and editing for online communication media desirable but not required.

4)    Location where the intern would be housed

The intern will have a designated space, with a desk and a computer at Illinois Public Health Institute, 954 West Washington, 4th Floor, Chicago, IL 60607.

5)    Duration of internship and time commitment

The duration and time commitment will be negotiated between the successful applicant and her internship supervisor, and be further defined according by the internship requirements of the student’s school.  Interns will be expected to track their own hours worked and meet all negotiated requirements.

Generally, work will be carried out between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Mondays through Fridays.  IPHI will be happy to work with the student’s institution to support course credit or practicum requirements.

6)    Compensation for the internship

This is an unpaid position.

7)    How to apply

No phone calls, please. To apply, send the following three items

  • a personalized cover letter referencing the candidate’s relevant experience and training and how they fit the internship opportunity
  • a resume or curriculum vitae
  • one writing sample, no longer than five pages

to Kristin.Monnard@iphionline.org.  Applications without all three requirements will not be considered.

8)   Equal Opportunity Employer

The Illinois Public Health Institute is an equal opportunity employer that values diversity. We commit to our coworkers, applicants and community to have internships and job opportunities open to everyone equally. It is the policy and practice of IPHI not to discriminate against any coworker or applicant on hiring decisions or career advancement because of race, color, religion national origin, age, sex, disability, sexual orientation, status as a disabled veteran, veteran of the Vietnam Era, or any other personal characteristic which is not a relevant qualification to the specific position.


 

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Local Policy Database Scan

In early 2013, IPHI formed a collaboration with the Mississippi Public Health Institute and the Texas Health Institute  to investigate the current state and uses for local policy databases in community health.  The collaboration, led by IPHI, used an iterative approach to conduct the scan, using the Institutes’ expertise, advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Network of Public Health Institutes, and subject matter experts to define the scope of the scan and test it against our consultants’ model policy databases.

The collaboration executed 28 key informant interviews with subject matter experts and two online assessments of 250 potential users and database stewards. This data collection confirmed a lack of any comprehensive national-level database containing local, healthy communities’ policies and proposed conditions under which such a system might be created. The project found that existing local policy databases differ in focus, structure, detail, accessibility and comprehensiveness because of the siloed nature of project funding, the absence of any central coordination, and the lack of standards for healthy community policy databases. While databases exist across a variety of healthy communities’ topic areas, no single database addresses them all, and not all public policy areas for healthy communities are addressed in existing databases. While the definition of healthy communities is evolving, most current policy databases do not reflect the increasing interest in quantitative analysis and policy impact, or the increasing emphasis on public health systems and social determinants of health.

Key Findings:

End-User Environment

  • Policy database users can be categorized into two groups: 1) practitioners and policy makers and 2) researchers.
  • Users are interested in a well-maintained, accessible local policy database.
  • Users are interested in indicators of evidence base and evaluative measures.
  • Existing databases may provide a foundation for a local policy database model.
  • Some end-users are willing to pay for access to a local policy database that meets their needs.

Policy Database Environment

  • No comprehensive policy database for healthy communities was identified.
  • Existing database structures are very diverse and inconsistent.
  • Databases have been developed in a siloed fashion.
  • Policy databases include some common descriptive elements that can be standardized and others that are topic-specific.
  • Database maintenance and governance is a major challenge.
  • There is no standard for routine local policy database external evaluation.
  • There is no consensus on who should host a comprehensive local policy database.

The final report included recommendations to create a forum and process for establishing standards and common criteria for policy databases, and leverage desirable features of existing databases and tools.

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The Basics of Program Evaluation – archived classroom training

Originally presented on June 16, 2009

Presentation Slides in PDF

 

Description

Funded by the Illinois Dept. of Public Health

This training extends the work of using logic models for program planning and outcome measurement to include the issues related to program evaluation. Participants will learn about using appropriate social science research methods for program evaluation and, tailoring evaluation approaches to the unique characteristics of the program.  In addition, participants will explore the basics of assessing the need for the program, theory and design, implementation, outcomes/impact and efficiency to understand the impact and relevancy to program evaluation.  The training will provide opportunities for “hands on” activities to apply key learning from the training.  If you have a program that you are ready to evaluate, we welcome you to join us as we walk through the basics of program evaluation.

Prerequisite:  It is highly recommended that you have previously attended the Developing Logic Models and Developing Outcome Measurement Plans trainings in the past or that you have thoroughly reviewed the training materials.  The training will build upon this basic information.

 

Objectives

Participants attending this workshop will be able to:

1. Describe how to use logic models as the basis for program planning and outcome measurement.
2. Identify basic issues regarding program evaluation including needs assessment, program theory, program process and impact assessment
3. Formulate appropriate evaluation questions
4. Describe the “evaluation hierarchy” and ways to apply it to health programs
5. Describe the need for tailoring evaluations based on program structure and circumstances

 

Target Audience

This training session is designed as a follow-up course to the Developing Logic Models to Plan, Communicate and Evaluate and Developing Outcome Measurement Plans.  It is not a pre-requisite that participants have attended the training.  However, all participants should have a basic understanding of logic models and outcome measurement.  IPLAN coordinators, administrators, health educators, preventionists and health promoters are encouraged to attend to learn how to begin to evaluate the programs they offer.  Class size is limited to 40 participants.  Priority registration will be given to local public health department staff.

 

Presenter

Mark Edgar, PhD

Mark Edgar is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Springfield (UIS) and a consultant to the Illinois Public Health Institute on issues of evaluation, assessment and planning. He received his PhD in Public Health from Saint Louis University and his Master’s in Public Health from University of Illinois at Springfield. Past positions include Senior Research Associate at Saint Louis University School of Public Health, Researcher at SIU School of Medicine, Director of Epidemiology at the Adams County Health Department and adjunct faculty at UIS and Quincy University. His research has been published in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice and Public Health Reports and presented at the annual meetings of the American Public Heath Association, the National Network of Public Health Institutes and Academy Health’s Public Health Systems Research Interest Group. Dr. Edgar’s teaching includes graduate, undergraduate and community-based courses and workshops in statistics, research methods, public health administration and policy, program planning, outcome measurement, and program evaluation. He has over 20 years of experience working with public health and human services programs, schools of public health, medicine and nursing, and nonprofit organizations throughout the country. Most of his work has focused on assessment, evaluation, program development, and public health research in both academic and practice settings. Funding sources for Dr. Edgar’s work have included the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The National Network of Public Health Institutes, the Office of Rural Health Policy and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

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Developing Outcome Measurement Plans – archived classroom training

Originally presented on September 24, 2008

Presentation Slides in PDF

 

Description

More and more we find that our funders, administrators, partners and even our community stakeholders are demanding to see the results of our work. We have an increased need to demonstrate the health impact of our programs and outreach efforts on our target populations. We are encouraged to “measure” our impact and implement evidence-based programs and strategies. If you want to learn how to develop easy to follow outcome measurement plans, this is the training for YOU.

This training serves as a follow-up course to the “Developing Logic Models to Plan, Communicate and Evaluate training. In this interactive session, participants will learn and apply criteria to assess which outcomes to measure, identify the best indicators of success and appropriate data sources and learn how to determine a measurement cycle. Participants will discuss and identify solutions related to hard-to-measure outcomes and various data challenges. Participants should bring a draft of a logic model for a particular program. Participants will apply the knowledge gained in the training by developing outcome measurement plans for their logic models. Participants will receive coaching and feedback on their plans during the session.

 

Target Audience

This training session is designed as a follow-up course to the Developing Logic Models to Plan, Communicate and Evaluate. It is not a prerequisite that participants have attended the Logic Model training. However, all participants should have a basic understanding of logic models and bring a draft of a logic model to work on during the interactive training session. IPLAN coordinators, administrators, health educators, preventionists and health promoters are encouraged to attend to learn how to begin to measure the impact of the programs they offer. Class size is limited to 40 participants. Priority registration will be given to local public health department staff.

 

Objectives

Participants attending this workshop will:

1. Review basic components of a logic model.
2. Apply criteria to assess which outcomes to measure.
3. Identify outcome indicators for their logic models.
4. Discuss special problems/issues with hard-to-measure outcomes.
5. Identify data sources for the outcome indicators selected.
6. Understand the benefits and drawbacks of various types of primary and secondary data sources.
7. Develop a measurement cycle and tracking plan for evaluation.

 

Presenters

Mark Edgar, PhD

Mark Edgar is visiting assistant professor of public health at the University of Illinois at Springfield (UIS) and a consultant to the Illinois Public Health Institute on issues of evaluation, assessment and planning. He received his PhD in Public Health from Saint Louis University and his Master’s in Public Health from University of Illinois at Springfield. Past positions include Senior Research Associate at Saint Louis University School of Public Health, Researcher at SIU School of Medicine, Director of Epidemiology at the Adams County Health Department and adjunct faculty at UIS and Quincy University. His research has been published in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice and Public Health Reports and presented at the annual meetings of the American Public Heath Association, the National Network of Public Health Institutes and Academy Health’s Public Health Systems Research Interest Group. Dr. Edgar’s teaching includes graduate, undergraduate and community-based courses and workshops in statistics, research methods, public health administration and policy, program planning, outcome measurement, and program evaluation. He has over 20 years of experience working with public health and human services programs, schools of public health, medicine and nursing, and nonprofit organizations throughout the country. Most of his work has focused on assessment, evaluation, program development, and public health research in both academic and practice settings. Funding sources for Dr. Edgar’s work have included the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, The National Network of Public Health Institutes, the Office of Rural Health Policy and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

Laurie Call, BA

Laurie Call is the director of the Illinois Public Health Institute Center for Community Capacity Development. Call has 18 years experience in training and instructional design for social service providers, coalition members, community health planners and preventionists. Serving as a consultant, she has assisted various organizations and groups including Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, National Guard Bureau, Illinois National Guard Counter Drug and Center for Prevention Research and Development. Call began her career with Prevention First. During her 14 years at Prevention First, Call served the state substance abuse prevention system by assisting in the development, implementation and capacity building of a statewide outcome based planning system. She has provided technical assistance and training for logic model development to many individuals and organizations ranging from program-level logic models to state-wide logic models.

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Hypertension and Prevention in the Community – archived webinar

Originally presented on June 25, 2008

To view the webinar: Download the Web-ex Meeting Player. Select ‘Download the Meeting Service Recorder, Player and Recording Editor’. The player must be downloaded for the web-conference .wrf file to open.

Click Here to View Recorded Webinar

Presentation Slides in PDF

 

Description

In this session, presenters will provide an overview of the science and impact of hypertension on cardiovascular health and heart disease.  Addressing hypertension at the community level can be accomplished through community-wide screening efforts and follow-up.  Presenters will explain guidelines for blood pressure screenings and how to develop a community initiative for residents to ‘Get Smart’ through screenings.  Information will address all stages of planning efforts including assessment, planning, implementation and measurement.  Tool kits and many resources to support this work will be shared to assist local community organizations and health departments at organizing, marketing and scheduling screenings.  Communities who have had success with community screenings will share their experience, including tips for kicking off the initiative, developing key community partnerships and engaging the workplace.  Participants will also hear about how they can help their communities ‘Start Smart’ by learning all about the free, online physical activity tracking program.  Participants will learn how to access free ‘Start’ resources including media ads, press releases, PowerPoint presentation, flyers and much more.  Engaging the workplace in ‘Start’ can be especially effective and presenters will share what some Illinois businesses have done to improve employee health and wellness with physical activity programs.  The formal presentation will be followed by a live ‘Question and Answer’ session with the presenters.

 

Objectives

Participants in this Web conference will be able to:

1. Explain the impact of hypertension on cardiovascular health and heart disease.
2. Identify the guidelines for blood pressure screenings and follow-up.
3. Explain how to develop a community-wide screening initiative by engaging community partners as well as at-risk populations.
4. Explain the ‘Start’ program and how individuals and workplaces can use this free tool to help them track their physical activity.
5. Access online toolkits and resources to support community efforts to conduct screenings and promote the ‘Start’ program for physical activity.

 

Target Audience

IPLAN coordinators, administrators, health educators, nurses, preventionists and health promoters are encouraged to participate to learn how to address cardio vascular heath and prevent heart disease through reducing hypertension and increasing physical activity.

 

Presenters

Peggy L. Jones
Director, State Health Alliances
American Heart Association

Michael Gaines
Program Manager—Illinois Heart Disease and Stroke Program

Danucha Brikshavana
Illinois Department of Public Health

Tina Steinway
Corporate Development Director
American Heart Association

Joseph M. Harrington
Assistant Commissioner
Chicago Department of Public Health

Jan Morris
Health Department Promotion Program Manager
McLean County Health Department

Carrie Titus
Community Health Educator
Henry and Stark Counties Health Department

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Survey Basics: Designing and Administering Useful Surveys – archived webinar

Originally presented on August 27, 2008

To view the webinar: Download the Web-ex Meeting Player. Select ‘Download the Meeting Service Recorder, Player and Recording Editor’. The player must be downloaded for the web-conference .wrf file to open.

Click Here for Recorded Webinar

Presentation Slides in PDF

 

Description

The complex techniques and myriad of options that arise in designing and administering quality surveys can be daunting to a layperson. The advancement of survey instruments, such as web-based tools, has helped ease the burden of administration, but skill is still needed to choose questions and design a good survey. With the increasing reliance on assessment and program evaluation, it is particularly important for laypersons to know how to design and administer surveys that demonstrate program impact, measure intervention effectiveness, uncover community needs, and create baseline measures for program improvement.

This training serves to provide knowledge and skills to a non-scientific audience about survey development and administration. The training will begin with an overview of various types of surveys to familiarize participants with the basics of survey research. Participants will be exposed to the mechanics of developing a survey. This will include ways to find an appropriate sample, testing the survey, and assuring the survey is culturally appropriate. Participants will then dive into the development of survey questions to gather appropriate data for its intended purpose. The trainer will use the survey types available in Survey Monkey, a free web-based, online survey tool, to help participants understand the application and utility of each question. Participants will also learn about the utility of each question in the context of data collection, analysis, and reporting. After the web-based training, the trainer will be available to answer questions and help participants think through ways to apply survey research to their work.

 

Objectives

Participants in this web-conference will be able to:

1. Understand the basic components of developing a survey
2. Learn how to test a survey for cultural appropriateness
3. Assess the use of survey questions for gathering appropriate data
4. Explore the importance of collection, analysis, and reporting survey results
5. Apply the use of an online, web-based survey tool

 

Target Audience

This training is designed as a basic introduction to survey development for those who are not research scientists but use research techniques such as surveying. IPLAN coordinators, administrators, health educators, nurses, preventionists and health promoters are encouraged to participate.

 

Presenter

Chris Giangreco, PhD
Policy Coordinator
Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights

Giangreco serves as the lead in policy supporting family economic stability at Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights. He serves as co-chair of the Illinois Asset Building Group. He works to connect Heartland’s policy efforts with asset-building programming. He has experience in coalition-building, developing and advancing policy proposals, and research and evaluation in a variety of areas – health, transportation, housing, and environmental policy. Prior to his policy work, Chris spent seven years studying and conducting research on health and human service programs. Chris received his PhD through the sociology program at Loyola University Chicago with a focus on policy implementation. Prior to joining the Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights, Giangreco served as a Program Manager at the Illinois Public Health Institute where he practiced applied community research to advance public health policy

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